The SPECIFIC Skills That Can Help you Land That Dream Job in 2017

June 2, 2017

The skills you need to get hired at companies like Disney, Tesla, Google and more.

Following up on our list of the #LinkedInTopCompanies people want to work for, my colleague Maya Pope-Chappell wrote about the skills that hiring managers at these companies are looking for. This list is helpful, but it's also generic. Sure, tech companies are looking to hire people with Web Programming or Java Development skills, but can we get more specific than that?

Perhaps we can.

I've always been intrigued by what makes each company different or unique. Why do Apple products feel different than others? What makes a Disney experience so special?

In the book Be Our Guest, a veteran instructor from Disney's famous internal training program, Disney University, is quoted as saying “We don’t put people in Disney. We put Disney in people.”

It's often said that success at a company is directly linked to its culture or having a strong vision or mission. Break that down, and it translates to the talent—the people—at those companies, and the unique skills they learn on the job. A company's culture and vision will infuse their employees with skills that help them achieve their shared vision and mission, and will attract others who are motivated to contribute to those things as well.

In other words, look at the specific skills of employees at a company, and you can get a pretty good understanding of what's required to work there. If you aspire to join a company, learning what unique skills their employees have can possibly give you an edge over other applicants.

Take User Experience Design for example.

Core skills for User Experience Designers are things like User ResearchUsability TestingWireframingMobile Design, or Rapid Prototyping. Look at the skills listed in the LinkedIn profiles of UX Designers across the tech landscape, and that's exactly what you'll find. But if you look at UX Designers who work at Google, you'll find Design Thinking on the list too — a skill not found on the profiles of UX Designers from any of the top 10 companies listed in the article I referenced above.

UX Designers at Facebook have unique skills like Experimental Design, Eye TrackingSPSSRStatisticsSocial Psychology, and Cognitive Psychology listed in their profiles—is it any wonder why Facebook drives so much innovation in their products? You won't find those skills being taught in most traditional UX Design curriculums. But if you aspire to work as a User Experience Designer at Facebook, adding some of these specific skills to your resume could give you an edge over other candidates who have more generic or traditional UX skillsets.

With this in mind, I took a look at three popular job functions (Software Development, Sales, and Data Analysis) across the top 10 companies people want to work for. For each area, I compiled the 5 most common skills, and also the most unique skills found at each company. For those interested in taking the next step, I also provided links to relevant LinkedIn Learning content.*

Software Development

If you're interested in the area of software development, here are the top common skills found in the profiles of people in software development roles who have worked at the top 10 companies in the list mentioned above, as well as the most unique skills—those skills that are found in profiles from one company, but not in any of the other 9 companies.

Sales

If you're interested in the area of sales, here are the top common skills found in the profiles of people in sales roles who have worked at the top 10 companies in the list mentioned above, as well as the most unique skills—those skills that are found in profiles from one company, but not in any of the other 9 companies.

Data Analysis

If you're interested in the area of data analysis, here are the top common skills found in the profiles of people in data analysis roles who have worked at the top 10 companies in the list mentioned above, as well as the most unique skills—those skills that are found in profiles from one company, but not in any of the other 9 companies.

You can learn all these of skills on LinkedIn Learning

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